1.31.2011

The Century of the Self - There is Policeman Inside all our Heads, He Must Be Destroyed

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This is part three of the Adam Curtis documentary that originally aired on BBC back in 2002.  In this episode, Mr. Curtis looks at Wilhelm Reich, including his theories of orgone energy, and posits that his theories were presented as an antidote to those of Sigmund Freud and his nephew Edward Bernays (a pioneer of the Public Relations profession).  Oddly enough, as a student, Dr. Reich was a student of Dr. Freud's back in the early 1920's.  But, more than that, the film takes a look at the roots and methods of modern consumerism, democracy, commodification and its implications.

Here is part 3:



Here is a downloadable version from Archive.org
Part 1 Part 2 Part 4
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1.30.2011

NA 274 Film

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Adam mentioned the film Kevin and Perry Go Large as the source for the hideous "vodka eyeball" trend.  I'm not sure that a little seen British comedy from 2000 actually inspired this trend, but who knows where bored white kids get their inspiration for idiocy.  NA fans will get a kick out of the line in the trailer that comes at :13.
Trailer:


The link below is a Region 2 DVD.


Vodka in the Eyeball Clip:


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1.29.2011

NA 273 Film

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Adam mentioned the film Virus X coming to DVD on the show from January, 27th.
The below trailer is rated R for quite a bit of gore.
Trailer:




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1.24.2011

The History of the "Oil Cabal" (part 8)

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We have come to the last installment of this great documentary on the history of the substance known as OIL!  In this episode, what we now call Gulf War I kicked off a new era for the role of oil in society.  The episode explores the relationship between oil and the "environmental conscience".  The actual title of part 8 is "The Prize: The Epic Quest for Oil, Money & Power - Part Eight: The New Order of Oil".  


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1.18.2011

NA 270 Film

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A pleathora of film talk at the end of the episode from January 16th. 

Robocop:




Total Recall:




Escape from New York:




Running Man:




Minority Report:




Fahrenheit 451:




Logan's Run:




Gattaca:




Demolition Man:




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NA 269 Film

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Adam raved about The King's Speech on the January 13th episode.  As I type this, it is playing in just over a thousand theatres in Gitmo Nation as well as Gitmo Nation East, Gitmo Nation Leprechaun, Gitmo Nation Down Under and Malta (I don't think they have a Gitmo Nation nickname, yet).

Trailer:




Adam also picked the film Guns and Weed as the movie of the week.
Here is the entire film on YouTube:


Trailer:


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1.17.2011

8: The Mormon Proposition

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 On episode 266, the Mormon religion came up as a topic of discussion, which made me think of this film that I caught at a local film festival in 2010.  The film doesn't go too deep into an examination of the Mormon church itself, but it is a scathing indictment of how religion and politics can and do mix here in Gitmo Nation.  It is available to "watch instantly" if you have Netflix.  Also, after re-watching it, I think the film would be very interesting to anyone living outside of Gitmo Nation as it illustrates how certain groups with an agenda (in this case the Mormon church) conspire to undermine the basic human rights of a group they don't agree with (homosexuals).

1.10.2011

Review: Casino Jack

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Reviewed by ReadyKilowatt

The opening scene basically sums up how the ruling class looks at the rest of us. We join Jack Abramoff, as played by Kevin Spacey, going through his morning routine. As he's brushing his teeth we're privy to his psyching up speech. Most people in the theater (and several online reviews) will remember the last line: “I'm Jack Abramoff, and I work out every day.” But astute No Agenda listeners will latch on to a line about halfway through... “I will not allow my family to be slaves.” To me, that's all that needed to be said. It confirms what we all know, that the ruling class views the rest of us as slaves to be exploited. Given that Hickenlooper spent 30 or so hours with Abramoff in jail, and such an intimate moment, I'm sure it is a direct quote. In fact, it wouldn't surprise me a bit to find out he still says the same speech to himself, even behind bars.

Spacey is fantastic as the over-the-top Abramoff, but the script glosses over details to get to the glitz and flash. This is a shame, because I believe Hickenlooper's goal to paint Abramoff as a complex man falls short of truly showing the criminal aspect of Abramoff's actions. Yes, we see a mob shooting, but Jack's involvement is presented as just being mixed up with the “wrong people.” Instead we see Abramoff the religious man in his yamaka, Abramoff the loving father and husband, and Abramoff the intellectual at the piano.

As the movie progresses we see how Abramoff manipulates the system to his client's (and his) advantage. When the native American tribe he's representing expresses their concern over another tribe's petition for their own casino, he has a conservative grass-roots organization mount an opposition campaign to stop it. When the tribal leaders oppose the outrageous retainer he commands, he runs a smear campaign against those leaders and puts people in who are much more open to his ideas.

Of course, Abramoff didn't get directly involved in the dirty work. For that he had Michael Scanlon, as played Barry Pepper. Scanlon the character (not sure about reality) was involved in the McCain smear campaign that led to George W. Bush getting elected, caused trouble in Florida during the 2000 recount fiasco, and was Abramoff's field guy getting friendlies elected to the tribal council in the movie. Pepper plays Scanlon as a soul-less “get all you can” type who seems to be all about consumption. He's got the unhappy trophy wife (Rachelle Lefevre), the mistresses, the cars, the tan, and the eye makeup. Even when we see into his personal life, there's just not much “there” there. While Hickenlooper goes to great effort to show that Abramoff is a man with a higher calling, Scanlon and the rest of his staff are shown as either lackeys or 2 dimensional props to feed setup lines to Abramoff.

However, Jon Lovitz as Adam Kidan will either go down as pure genius or a slander lawsuit. Kidan ran several businesses and campaigned for the Republicans in the 80s and 90s. He is presented as a frumpy loser, mixed up in the mob and a drug user. Abramoff uses him as a front man to buy a fleet of casino ships in Florida, which is what ultimately leads to Abramoff's downfall. Kidan is obviously in over his head, and knows that he's screwing the Greek mobster who owns the casinos ships, but since he has Jack to fall back to when things start to get tough, he isn't worried. Of course Abramoff screws him over in the end too.

As Kidan works on the deal, Jack is in Washington getting noticed. He's on the cover of Time, opening restaurants and starting a Jewish school. But he's also late with the mortgage and bouncing checks all over town. He needs the casino ship deal to go through, and the only way to get the money to make it all happen is to charge his outlandish retainers to the Native American tribes he's representing.

All this attention makes the partners at the lobbying firm he works for uneasy. They want him to tone it down, because “K Street likes to be invisible.” Jack refuses and is let go (also because his partners have some idea of what he's up to). But since he's such a hot property he easily gets on with another firm and it's right back to work. In Washington, it's all about who you know, and since he can get an audience with the Bush Whitehouse and then Speaker of the House Tom Delay, he's just the sort of scum you want working for your firm.

As his world starts to collapse, he's called before the Senate Committee for Indian Affairs, chaired by none other than John McCain. Hickenlooper does a nice job of mixing the C-SPAN coverage with re-created live action to allow Abramoff (the character) give the speech he wanted to say to the committee instead of pleading the 5th amendment. The movie should have ended at this point, but like so many of this genera, we get to see what ever happened to the various characters. As expected, they are just as shallow and dull as before, but now out of the spotlight and living much less exciting lives.

I wanted to enjoy this movie for what it is, lifestyles of the rich and famous. But the blatant attempts to show Abramoff as a misunderstood philosopher made it very hard to stomach. I think Hickenlooper and Spacey spent far too much time trying to make AbramoffNetfilx Queue, not something to run out and see in a theater.

One final thought for the crackpots: George Hickenlooper died just before the movie was released, supposedly because of a combination of sleep apnea, alcohol, and pain killers. Seems to me if the mob didn't like the way you portrayed them in your movie they may want to teach everyone else a lesson. After all, how many times do we see Hollywood make heroes out of the mafia?

Trailer:


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1.05.2011

NA 266 Film

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Adam mentioned watching the documentary Starsuckers on Sunday's show.  If you do a torrent search it is "out there", or it is available for purchase if you live outside of the US.  The trailer definitely sells the film:



The below link is for a Region 2 (aka Non-USA) format DVD player only.


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1.03.2011

Food Inc.

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 In honor of S. 510 getting thru the Senate, this weeks film takes a look at the power of the food industry in the United States.  Adam referenced this article from Natural News.com on show 265 that takes a pretty in depth look at the language of the bill and what it will mean for those of us 'slaves' who like to eat.  Food Inc. is a documentary from 2008 directed by Robert Kenner that uses the writings of Eric Schlosser (Fast Food Nation) and Michael Pollan (The Omnivore's Dilemma) as the basis for an investigation into where our food comes from and how it gets to our plate.

Trailer:



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