8.30.2010

Beyond Treason

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Since all of the troops are coming home from Iraq (except for around 50,000 troops and the State Department plans on doubling the number of private security forces), it seem appropriate to take a look at a documentary that looks at how the US Government treats it troops and veterans.  It is called Beyond Treason and was produced by The Power Hour (a pretty interesting radio/Internet show).  The entire film is available in segments on YouTube - here is part one.



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8.23.2010

The Power of Nightmares (Part II)

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Adam Curtis has been working through his own brand of documentary films for years now. This is the first one I saw and it is still my personal favorite. He walks through the steps that would be called "Shadow Puppet Theatre" on No Agenda. His premise is that those in power have figured out that The Power of Nightmares is good for keeping us slaves in line. The more we're scared, the more we will seek leaders that PRESENT themselves as strong and powerful men (and it is usually men). The problem is, those in charge seem to have forgotten that they created the nightmares and are now acting as if the nightmares are all real.

The Power of Nightmares: The Rise of the Politics of Fear part II The Phantom Victory tells the tale of Afghanistan during the Russian occupation from the point of view of the Islamists and the Western powers.  It explores how both Reagan and Osama bin Laden claimed victory when Russia fell in the late 1980's.  The Islamists try to take their Islamic revolution to Egypt and Algeria, with horribly violent results, eventually retreating to Afghanistan and adopting a new strategy of going after the Western power.  Meanwhile, the conservative Republicans fall out of power as the 1990's arrive, and spend their time going after President Clinton.

Here is Part II: The Phantom Victory:



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8.21.2010

NA 227 Film

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John recommended the 1936 Charlie Chaplin classic Modern Times on Thursday's show after Adam presented the news story about kids at a Richmond, VA preschool that uses tracking devices to keep track of the student/slaves.  The film was made as a comedic response to the Great Depression, but still has strong relevance in today's world.  It's also just great to see good old fashioned physical comedy.





Towards the end of the show, Adam and John played a clip of Lewis Black doing commentary on The Daily Show in response to the film Eat Pray Love and the marketing on the Home Shopping Network.  For example:




Side Note: The company that produced the film version of Eat Pray Love (Plan B Entertainment) is working on an Atlas Shrugged adaptation.

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8.16.2010

NA 226 Film

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John C. Dvorak suggested I Am a Fugitive From a Chain Gang (1932), a great pre-Hays Code film staring Paul Muni.  They don't make trailers like this anymore:






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The New (Corporate) World Order

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Even is you are not on board with Alex Jones' version of the New World Order, the documentary The Corporation will leave you convinced that there is at least Corporate World Order. Since the Supreme Court ruled that Corporations are legal individuals, this documentary set out to perform a psychological evaluation on this new type of "individual". Turns out, the "people" know as corporations are sociopaths.

Here is the trailer:



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8.09.2010

Overlooked Gem or Standard Hollywood Propaganda

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Wanted to mix in something a little lighter as the Monday Movie this week.  Well, lighter might not be the best word to use.  Let's just say it's got more action than anything else on this page, however, the subject matter is just as complex and interesting as anything blogged below.

A few months after the 2008 financial collapse, The International comes out in theaters.  An evil bank gets its comeuppance at the hands of a noble INTERPOL agent.  Perhaps the timing is coincidental, since an average studio production takes almost two years to complete, or maybe the powers that be saw this collapse coming.  Either way, the film cost 50 million dollars, before marketing, an pulled in just over 25 million in the US with an additional 34 million coming from overseas.  So money was recouped, but by Hollywood standards, this film was not a hit.

It is worth noting that the cast and crew are remarkably international.  A German director.  Actors from the UK, Australia, Denmark, Ireland, Russia and the USA (and those are just the six top billed actors).  The film is set all over the globe and includes scene in English, German and French. 

Side note: There is an interesting trend is recent action films.  In Casino Royal, the bad guy (Le Chiffre) is played by my current favorite actor, Mads Mikkelsen, a Dane.  Ulrich Thomsen, also a Dane, is the "bad guy" in The International.  Maybe this trend will replace the generic Arab "bad guys" we were inundated with for years.  My question is, why does Hollywood want us to hate the Danish?  They make some of the best films.





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8.02.2010

The History of the "Oil Cabal" (part 3)

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In part three, The Black Giant, it is the Roaring Twenties and oil is a part of daily life.  From millions of new car owners to the "wildcatters" of Texas hoping to strike it big. The American oil industry wrestles with shortage and surplus, as flamboyant entrepreneur Calouste Gulbenkian stakes his claim in...wait for it...Iraq!
Here is Part II (the other parts will be posted on a once a month basis):



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